Superdry SD 3 Parka | Scathing Review Alert!

I’m just going to put this here, incase Superdry refuses to publish my review of this SD 3 parka to their website. It’s not exactly glowing…

Here’s the story behind this post: I bought a coat from Superdry, wore it, got soaked. Not much of a story, but hey, I just spent £125 on a coat that’s neither warm, nor dry, so I’m understandably pissed off.

“Judging by the name “Superdry”, I assumed (wrongly) that this “Superdry sD 3 Parka” coat would be waterproof. I got drenched on the way to work (a 15 minute walk) during a downpour. The coat leaked, leaving my arms not only wet, but also cold because the quilting is rubbish, making the coat poorly insulated. The coat appears bulky and is a little uncomfortable to wear, but still manages to feel thin and flimsy because the lining is terrible.

I checked the website after purchasing in-store (and getting drenched) and there’s no mention of it being waterproof, but still – from a £120+ coat, I’d assume it would keep me a little warm and dry. Sure, it looks okay, but I sought practicality rather than pure style (and I wouldn’t exactly call this stylish). What’s more, Superdry’s returns policy is shocking – you can only exchange or have a credit note, no returns. Poor quality item and service. I’ll probably donate this to charity.”

This is the coat in question: 

 

http://www.superdry.com/womens/jackets/details/48432/sd---3-parka
http://www.superdry.com/womens/jackets/details/48432/sd—3-parka

Basically, don’t buy it. I actually think it’s rather ugly, but I can deal with a little ug in exchange for snug. And dryness. NOPE. No snug/dryness here. If you want a proper coat, go to Blacks, Mountain Warehouse, Northface – anywhere but Superdry, really.


Warmth: 2/10. Id’ get more warmth if I climbed inside a cold sausage roll.

Dryness: 4/10. Okay, it’s not as bad as wrapping yourself in Andrex, but it’s pretty pathetic. Water seeped into my elbow-pits and waistline area.

Style: 5/10. If it’s going to be shit quality, it could at least try to look nice. It’s not completely hideous, but I’d appreciate its practical ugliness if it actually was practical. It’s gained points for the novelty of making me feel like I’m on an expedition to the Arctic circle. 

Comfort: 4/10. So heavy and bulky to wear, but somehow flimsy at the same time. 

Price: £124.99

Overall Rating: 2/10. I HATE THIS COAT. But it could be worse (if it were made of 2 ply toilet roll, for example). 

Returning an item without a receipt: The magic of Twitter

This isn’t a simple review post. This is mostly just me singing the praises of Office’s customer service department. I know, not the type of thing I usually write about – well, not on this blog, anyway. I actually write a blog for a business, with a focus on ecommerce and all things related, including marketing and – here it comes – customer service. So, naturally, today’s exchange with shoe brand Office’s customer service and social media department really excited me (I have the saddest life ever).

Here’s what happened, in a nutshell

I saw some shoes, I liked the shoes, I bought the shoes. I paid cash. I wore the shoes. I no longer liked the shoes. My feet cried, I felt sorry for them, I agreed to take them back after the weekend. I spent the weekend at Monsieur Raptor’s. I returned home. I discovered Mother Raptor had cleaned my room and lost my receipt. I lamented my tragic life.

 – Fin.

The Shoes: Gatsby Mid Heels - http://www.office.co.uk/view/product/office_catalog/2,33/1810900371
The Shoes: Gatsby Mid Heels – http://www.office.co.uk/view/product/office_catalog/2,33/1810900371

So I’ve set the scene for you. Have you spotted my issue? I bought the shoes in cash and lost the receipt. This should mean that I’m unable to return the shoes as there is no proof of purchase, and they’re not faulty. Now, having just paid for a holiday to Budapest, a Google Nexus Tablet, a warm winter coat, and various other bits and bobs, piddling away £48 on a pair of shoes I’ll never wear is not the best news for my purse. 

So I decided to Tweet the brand, in the hope that they’d give me some advice on what to do. I assumed they’d tell me there’s no solution other than curling up in a ball and getting wasted on my own tears, or that they would contact head department and get back to me, or just not reply at all.

Nope

Approximately 10 minutes later, I had a reply asking for the details of the shoe – item number, size etc.-  I handed over the info, and they somehow managed to find my receipt, and DM’d me a number to quote in-store to return the shoes.

Office, I could kiss you. In about half an hour, I went from moping about the office (as in my office, where I work,, not the shoe store in question), considering selling a kidney for money, to squawking with all the glee of a baby bird having its first meal of regurgitated worm. Ecstatic.

The Lesson

Twitter can be a powerful tool in customer service. As all posts can be accessed by anyone with an internet connection, brands are aware that they’re more open to scrutiny, and it’s easier to look bad. Because of this, they are more likely to accommodate your needs and requests – imagine if the store was rammed with customers, and a sales assistant was not only rude and unhelpful, but loud about it. Chances are, they’d lose some customers, have some bad word-of-mouth PR and generally look like dickholes. Well, this is what happens on Twitter: customer Tweets brand, brand replies with “computer says no”, they look bad, they lose customers.

So, if you’ve lost a receipt or have a faulty item, try taking it up with the brand’s Twitter team. Chances are, they’re more knowledgable in customer service standards than your garden-variety shop assistant, so you might have more luck than simply going in store.

Have you tried Tweeting a company before trying in-store? How did that work out for you? I’d love to hear your positive (or negative!) customer service stories!

Madame Raptor x

 

 

Jurassic Jumper: Fat Face

Okay…this might be from the boys section. And by boys, I mean boys, not mens. But let’s be honest: it’s pretty damn cool, right? It’s got a dinosaur on it; of course it is.

It’s snuggly without being too warm when the weather is unpredictable, and it goes rather nicely with a red skater skirt. It’s a size – sorry, age – 12-13, so I’m thankful I can squeeze myself into it, though I’ll admit I like a little room for my breasts to frolic around my chest, but let’s be honest: they don’t make boys’ clothes with breasts in mind, do they? No.

It’s a really generous size, to be fair. I think it’s the biggest size they do in boys, and it fits. Not a baggy fit, which is a quality I usually find desirable in a jumper, but fits nonetheless, and I can forgo bagginess in favour of a totally rad T-rex. 

They really don’t make enough dinosaur themed women’s apparel, but on the upside, I’m excited that I’ve broadened my horizons and exposed myself to an untapped (and reasonably priced) source of fashion: boys clothes.